Developing a Complete Picture of Alzheimer’s Disease

New Insights through Imaging

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with the presence of specific proteins in the brains of people who suffer from this illness. An examination of the brain after death is the most definitive way to confirm presence of AD. The brain is complex, and some research is difficult or impossible to do with living people. Information from brain studies can help researchers and doctors better understand AD.

Thanks to brain donation, we hope to validate tools to detect AD while a person is alive so that it can be treated and perhaps, one day, cured.

Seeing brain changes in AD both during life and after death is important. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has the ability to visualize specific proteins related to the disease in the brain of living individuals with AD. It is used by doctors and researchers to help diagnose and manage AD and find better treatment for people living with AD or other dementias.

Examination of the brain following death helps confirm the diagnosis of AD, which can also provide closure and insight for loved ones.

Brain donation at the time of death is one of the most important and generous gifts an individual with AD and their family can make. It provides hope for medical breakthroughs and faith in discovery of a cure for AD.

The ADvance Program

Developing a Complete Picture of Alzheimer’s Disease

New Insights through Imaging

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with the presence of specific proteins in the brains of people who suffer from this illness. An examination of the brain after death is the most definitive way to confirm presence of AD. The brain is complex, and some research is difficult or impossible to do with living people. Information from brain studies can help researchers and doctors better understand AD.

Thanks to brain donation, we hope to validate tools to detect AD while a person is alive so that it can be treated and perhaps, one day, cured.

Seeing brain changes in AD both during life and after death is important. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has the ability to visualize specific proteins related to the disease in the brain of living individuals with AD. It is used by doctors and researchers to help diagnose and manage AD and find better treatment for people living with AD or other dementias.

Examination of the brain following death helps confirm the diagnosis of AD, which can also provide closure and insight for loved ones.

Brain donation at the time of death is one of the most important and generous gifts an individual with AD and their family can make. It provides hope for medical breakthroughs and faith in discovery of a cure for AD.